KGF Chapter 1: Rocky’s Rage

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First things first, KGF – Chapter 1 is here to stay. A combination of cinematography, musical score, screenplay and execution on screen contrive to take KGF to levels hitherto unseen and heights previously unattained, in the annals of the otherwise illustrious Kannada film industry.

Coming to the plot of the movie, the genesis finds its voice in the year 1951. A confluence of two profund events in the form of the birth of the protagonist and the discovery of gold in the mines of Kolar Gold Fields (K.G.F) sets in motion a high octane, racy and rambunctious chain of events. Seeped in poverty Yash, a.k.a Raja Krishnappa Bairya (“Rocky”) heads to the city of dreams and dons, Mumbai to carve a niche for himself. Aided by a fearless nature and untrammeled ambition, Rocky soon becomes a don of fearsome repute. Rocky takes on the big bad boys whose synonyms are gold smuggling. After successfully warding away Inayat Khalil a menacing mafia don from laying down his marker in the bullion black market in Mumbai, Rocky is dispatched on what seems to be a ‘point-of-no-return’ mission back home where he finds himself face to face with the ruthless Garuda, the monarch of Kolar Gold Fields (KGF) who murders people for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Will Rocky liberate the enslaved miners from K.G.F thereby stopping Garuda in his tracks forms the crux and core of KGF.

Yash, as Rocky, scorches, and sizzles. He is suave, sleek and sensational. A gun toting, witticisms mouthing, human-wrecking machine, Yash holds his audience in absolute thrall as a brooding hulk who neither brooks opposition nor obstinacy. Breathtaking in all his stunt sequences, Yash has in one fell swoop and one single clean stroke, bid goodbye to his stereotypical romantic chocolate boy next door image. This paradigm shift is more than just welcome. There is a definite finesse to his performance that is refreshingly non-linear and electric. Even though at times the plot becomes thick and heavy with layers of complications and a plethora of characters, Yash manages to hold his own with a ridiculous ease that is frightening.

Ravi Basrur has reinvented himself with a background score that is easily the best in Kannada cinema over the past few or even many) years. The contextual and thematic scores are lilting and haunting leaving a scarring impression.

Prashant Neel excels in his screenplay and direction. Of especial mention is the climax which blisteringly sets up the excited viewers for the much anticipated sequel. The assiduous employ of monochrome, colour and VFX is a troika whose brilliant coalescence is one which till now has been alien to Kannada cinema.

The cinematography by Bhuvan Gowda is melancholic, simmering and impatient.

The veteran Anant Nag as the narrator and a senior journalist is his usual expected effortless self. Srinidhi Shetty as Yash’s accidental love interest just manages to hold her own even though the script has nothing spectacular or significant for her to deliver. Ramachandra Raju as the antagonistic Garuda is scary enough commensurate with the needs of the script.

KGF however is Yash and vice versa. This movie is sure to mark a renaissance in the acting career of this promising young star.

KGF – SALAM ROCKY BHAI!

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